Everywhere you turn, there’s more competition. No matter what type of store or business you operate, there are bound to be others clamoring for your customers and your piece of the market
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What will cause customers to buy from you rather than your competitors? The answer is to meet their needs in these five critical areas:
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1) Talk less about yourself.

Customers don’t care how you feel. They care about how you make them feel and people feel good when they talk about themselves. Let your competition have the “Me Me Me” messages.

They care about how you make them feel and people feel good when they talk about themselves. Let your competition have the “Me Me Me” messages.
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2) Interview customers who don’t buy.

When it comes to selling, there is no more valuable piece of information than what you learn when you ask: “Why didn’t you buy?” Way too

When it comes to selling, there is no more valuable piece of information than what you learn when you ask: “Why didn’t you buy?” Way too much sales energy goes into replicating success when the real issue is avoiding the errors. Correct those errors and your competition will keep spinning their wheels.
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3) Always do something extra.

It’s amazing how few companies “get” this. Never ship a product or provide a service without providing at least just a little bit more than the customer expected. This can Include a free gift, an extra 5% off. Even a personal note counts
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4) Anticipate future needs.

Selling is like chess; if you want to win, you’ve got to think five or six steps ahead. If a customer is important to you, you should know–even before the customer knows–how you’ll be able to help them in the future. Most importantly, think at least a couple of steps ahead of your competitors. Checkmate!

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5) Put your customer’s needs first.

This is a very basic rule, but few people follow it when it means losing a sale. Instead, sellers tend to convince themselves that the customer should buy, even when the seller knows, deep down, that it’s not the customer’s best choice. If you make a sale, you’ve got a customer. Forego a sale (when appropriate) and you’ve won a friend.

This is a very basic rule, but few people follow it when it means losing a sale. Instead, sellers tend to convince themselves that the customer should buy, even when the seller knows, deep down, that it’s not the customer’s best choice. If you make a sale, you’ve got a customer. Forego a sale (when appropriate) and you’ve won a friend.

JARA:

Find customers for your customers. When you find customers for your customers, you’re no longer somebody who’s selling–you’re now part of their team.
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Which one of these have you tried and has worked for you?
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